Minimum Wage in Montgomery County Set to Increase Again

While is seems like the minimum wage in Montgomery County, Maryland was just increased to $10.75, employers are now less than 90 days away from the next increase. On July 1, 2017, the minimum wage will rise to $11.50 per hour.   While this increase is not a surprise, as the legislation approving this lift in the minimum wage rate was passed several years ago, the fact remains that Montgomery County will have the highest minimum wage in the State of Maryland.  However, Prince George’s County, Maryland will shortly follow and increase its minimum wage to $11.50 on October 1, 2017.   Employers in the District of Columbia are already required to comply with the $11.50 minimum wage.

As a reminder, for all hours worked over 40 in a given work week the employee must be paid time-and-one-half. In other words, all overtime hours must be paid at a rate of $17.25/per hour.

For more information on minimum wage and overtime issues, please contact Scott A. Mirsky at (301) 664-7710 or samirsky@mirskylawgroup.com.

Disclaimer: The content of this blog is intended for informational purposes only. It is not intended to solicit business or to provide legal advice. Laws differ by state and jurisdiction. The information on this blog may not apply to every reader. You should not take any legal action based upon the information contained on this blog without first seeking professional counsel. Your use of the blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Mirsky Law Group, LLC.

Alert! Montgomery County Employers: Required Paid Time-Off Starts on October 1, 2016

The Montgomery County Earned Sick and Safe Leave Law goes into effect on October 1, 2016.  Under this new law, all employers in Montgomery County will be required to implement policies that allow employees to accrue paid time-off to be used under certain circumstances, including but not limited to, (1) when the employee (or his/her family member) is sick, (2) when there is a public health emergency closing the employer’s place of business or schools, (3) when the employee (or his/her family member) is the victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

If an employer has at least one employee working in Montgomery County, then the employer must comply with the law.  Employers with five or more employees must allow their employees to earn 1 hour of paid leave for every 30 hours worked up to a minimum of 56 hours of paid leave each year.  Employers with less than five employees must allow their employees to earn at least 32 hours of paid leave and 24 hours of unpaid leave.

If an employer already provides at least 56 hours of paid leave (which can be used for the same situations, and in the same manner, as enumerated in the Montgomery County Earned Sick and Safe Leave Law), then the employer is most likely in compliance with the leave requirements of the new law and does not need to provide additional hours of paid leave.

However, it important to note, that under the new law all employers in Montgomery County are required to provide its employees with a written statement (or an online portal) which shows the employee how many hours of paid time off they have available to use.

Finally, all employers in Montgomery County must notify their employees that they are entitled to sick and safe leave.  The notice must comport with certain requirements or include the model notice prepared by Montgomery County.

All employers who have employees located in Montgomery County should immediately review their leave polices to ensure compliance with the new law and consult with an employment attorney who is familiar with the Montgomery County Earned Sick and Safe Leave Law.  If an employer in Montgomery County does not offer paid time-off or does not have a written policy describing paid time-off, now is the time to address this issue.

-Scott A. Mirsky  ©

Disclaimer: The content of this blog is intended for informational purposes only. It is not intended to solicit business or to provide legal advice. Laws differ by state and jurisdiction. The information on this blog may not apply to every reader. You should not take any legal action based upon the information contained on this blog without first seeking professional counsel. Your use of the blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Mirsky Law Group, LLC.