Our construction practice helps architects and engineers negotiate and administer their contracts so they can get paid and stay out of court.

We routinely represent all players in construction matters ranging from residential new home construction, additions, and large – scale commercial projects including schools and museums.  The common contract issues are time and payment, delay damages, scope of work, and construction defects.  The disputes occur in a variety of tribunals including the American Arbitration Association and state or federal court.  The expertise involved typically requires understanding not only the terminology used by contractors and architects but also the construction means and methods.   The contracts at issue include the American Institute of Architect form contracts and those drafted independently by the contractor or architect.

The right time to hire a lawyer for a construction matter is before signing a contract or just prior to the time when one of the parties begins to make a claim for money.  As that is often difficult to predict, one should not engage in any construction or design of a project without having a construction lawyer readily available for consultation.  We offer general counsel services to architects, engineers and construction professionals for just that purpose and can assist in responses to request for information, change order requests and other communications.

The most successful parties in any construction are the ones who have consulted with an attorney early on who will guide them in both email and written correspondence in an attempt to resolve disputes that occur in the field during construction.  The money spent at that phase even with no dispute initiated is often money well spent as defenses can be properly preserved and positions can be properly articulated early on.

We have represented architects and engineers in defense of their design, we have represented subcontractors on payment and performance issues, and we have represented owners in those projects when the construction has either been grossly over budget or has not met the promises of the contracting parties.